What I Did, Volume 5

What I Did is a series that documents software development-related work I’ve done the previous week. As the old adage goes, that which is measured gets done, and there’s nothing like broadcasting to the world that you’ve done nothing to motivate the self, right?

This week:

  • My SQL-to-RTF project passed QA. Praise the Lord.
  • I finished Udacity’s Programming Foundations with Python. I’m new to neither Python nor OOP, but because I felt that my grasp of the latter was severely lacking, I enrolled and completed this course. This course was great, because it wasn’t for complete beginners (and thus, no lessons on what a string is or how to print integers), but it was simple enough that, at the end, I think I *finally* grasp the basics of OOP, how it is useful, and how to implement in Python.
  • I began the next course that’s part of Udacity’s Front-End Web Developer Nanodegree, which is Responsive Web Design Fundamentals.
  • I began looking up blog/website themes to see what I’d like to do. It’s kind of overwhelming, so I’ve started to skim the samples and clicking only on those that appeal to me immediately. It’s not the best system, but if I succumb to Decision Paralysis, this might never get done.

What I Did, Volume 4

What I Did is a series that documents software development-related work I’ve done the previous week. As the old adage goes, that which is measured gets done, and there’s nothing like broadcasting to the world that you’ve done nothing to motivate the self, right?

I am beyond thankful that this is a three-day weekend.

  • You know that SQL-to-RTF script I was doing and how I said I was done last week? I lied. It spilled over into the weekend, and it is currently in QA. I hope there will be no more changes and moves forward in the QA and delivery process.
  • On Udacity, I started Programming Foundations with Python. It’s a lower-level course, but it isn’t for complete beginners. I know my syntax, but I don’t feel comfortable with my grasp (or lack thereof) of object-oriented programming. This class focuses on that.

I meant to look up design ideas for this blog and the webpage that will serve as my portfolio, but I didn’t get around to that. That’s going on this week’s to-do list, along with my OOP course.

What I Did, Volume 3

What I Did is a series that documents software development-related work I’ve done the previous week. As the old adage goes, that which is measured gets done, and there’s nothing like broadcasting to the world that you’ve done nothing to motivate the self, right?

So, I’ve already broken my commitment for twice-weekly updates, so this WID post will count for both of my posts this week. My blog, my rules, right?

Anyway, what have I done since I last wrote to y’all?

  • I finished the SQL-to-RTF coding for a work project. This assignment is one that never ends, but the hard part is done. Some day, it will stop coming back from QA for design-related elements that I have little control over due to a third-party widget we use.
  • I did a bunch of stuff on Udacity!
    • I finished How to Use Git and GitHub. Then, I promptly forgot about version control and regretted it immediately when I wanted to roll back some a lot of changes I’d made for an assignment for…
    • Intro to HTML and CSS. I started and finished this course, and in addition to learning the basics of boxification, HTML, CSS, and Bootstrap, I produced my first ever page from a provided mock-up (and according to the bots, I’m only off from the original by 0.75%):

orange-udacity-mug

What’s next? Python, Python, and more Python.

What I Did, Volume 2

What I Did is a series that documents software development-related work I’ve done the previous week. As the old adage goes, that which is measured gets done, and there’s nothing like broadcasting to the world that you’ve done nothing to motivate the self, right?

  • I’m working on creating an interface that allows users to generate customized letters populated with a specific patient’s plan of care information. I need to return the relevant data from the SQL database, convert the output table to RTF, and populate it into our software’s documents editor. Last week, I converted a legacy SQL-to-RTF script from VBA to VB.NET, so this week, I focused on writing the SQL query that returns the necessary data.
  • I made some progress on Udacity’s How to Use Git and GitHub course. At the beginning of the week, I was just under halfway through lesson 3. At the end of the week, I am just over halfway through said lesson. 😦

Because of the time I spent on my SQL-to-RTF scripts and related queries (oh, and the go-live for a pilot program that I found out about an hour and forty minutes before it occurred) resulted in three days where I worked overtime, I didn’t make as much progress as I had hoped. I didn’t finish the course on version control, I didn’t even touch the intro on HTML/CSS, let alone make it through the whole course, and I haven’t seen Python in about a week and a half.

Here’s hoping this week treats my self-education plans well. The plans:

What I Did, Volume 1

This is a new series that documents software development-related work I’ve done the previous week. As the old adage goes, that which is measured gets done, and there’s nothing like broadcasting to the world that you’ve done nothing to motivate the self, right?

  • I finished Lesson 2 of Udacity’s version control course (How to Use Git and GitHub), and as of Friday, I am about half way through lesson 3.
  • I converted an old script someone at my company wrote back in the day from VBA to VB.NET. I need to write a script that takes data returned from SQL tables and outputs it in RTF. Obviously, lots of tables, each its own size, are required. Joy.

Lessons 1 and 2 of the course on version control cover the basics of git, and lesson 3 covers code sharing via GitHub. I haven’t used either of these tools outside the course, but I’m eager to integrate these tools into both my work and my studies. I have never used anything more than the most primitive versions of version control (that is, I save multiple copies and label them with different numeric suffixes). This has to be better.

The script for work threw me for a loop at first. For some odd reason, I thought that the output had to be in HTML and only after spending all Friday morning trying to learn how to create such tables using SQL data in Visual Studio, I realized that a)that was NOT what I was supposed to be doing and b)out software doesn’t display HTML in the documents I was to generate anyway. Luckily, I found a script that converted SQL to RTF one of my colleagues wrote back in the day, and after a couple of hours, I had an updated version written in VB.NET

What’s next?

  • Going through Think Python as a refresher. It’s been a couple of weeks since I’ve touched Python, and after the time I put into learning it using 6.00.1x, I’m loath to lose this perishable skill. I also have access to CodeWars, so I’m looking to get back into that as well.
  • Finishing the course on version control
  • Beginning Udacity’s Intro to HTML and CSS