What I Did, Volume 2

What I Did is a series that documents software development-related work I’ve done the previous week. As the old adage goes, that which is measured gets done, and there’s nothing like broadcasting to the world that you’ve done nothing to motivate the self, right?

  • I’m working on creating an interface that allows users to generate customized letters populated with a specific patient’s plan of care information. I need to return the relevant data from the SQL database, convert the output table to RTF, and populate it into our software’s documents editor. Last week, I converted a legacy SQL-to-RTF script from VBA to VB.NET, so this week, I focused on writing the SQL query that returns the necessary data.
  • I made some progress on Udacity’s How to Use Git and GitHub course. At the beginning of the week, I was just under halfway through lesson 3. At the end of the week, I am just over halfway through said lesson. 😦

Because of the time I spent on my SQL-to-RTF scripts and related queries (oh, and the go-live for a pilot program that I found out about an hour and forty minutes before it occurred) resulted in three days where I worked overtime, I didn’t make as much progress as I had hoped. I didn’t finish the course on version control, I didn’t even touch the intro on HTML/CSS, let alone make it through the whole course, and I haven’t seen Python in about a week and a half.

Here’s hoping this week treats my self-education plans well. The plans:

What I Did, Volume 1

This is a new series that documents software development-related work I’ve done the previous week. As the old adage goes, that which is measured gets done, and there’s nothing like broadcasting to the world that you’ve done nothing to motivate the self, right?

  • I finished Lesson 2 of Udacity’s version control course (How to Use Git and GitHub), and as of Friday, I am about half way through lesson 3.
  • I converted an old script someone at my company wrote back in the day from VBA to VB.NET. I need to write a script that takes data returned from SQL tables and outputs it in RTF. Obviously, lots of tables, each its own size, are required. Joy.

Lessons 1 and 2 of the course on version control cover the basics of git, and lesson 3 covers code sharing via GitHub. I haven’t used either of these tools outside the course, but I’m eager to integrate these tools into both my work and my studies. I have never used anything more than the most primitive versions of version control (that is, I save multiple copies and label them with different numeric suffixes). This has to be better.

The script for work threw me for a loop at first. For some odd reason, I thought that the output had to be in HTML and only after spending all Friday morning trying to learn how to create such tables using SQL data in Visual Studio, I realized that a)that was NOT what I was supposed to be doing and b)out software doesn’t display HTML in the documents I was to generate anyway. Luckily, I found a script that converted SQL to RTF one of my colleagues wrote back in the day, and after a couple of hours, I had an updated version written in VB.NET

What’s next?

  • Going through Think Python as a refresher. It’s been a couple of weeks since I’ve touched Python, and after the time I put into learning it using 6.00.1x, I’m loath to lose this perishable skill. I also have access to CodeWars, so I’m looking to get back into that as well.
  • Finishing the course on version control
  • Beginning Udacity’s Intro to HTML and CSS